Mirre's personal artblog
A 24 year old human who likes to draw stuff, especially comics. This is my personal artblog where I will post doodles, WIPs and finished artwork and also text posts with ignorant opinions. I'm doing my best. Enjoy your stay!
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Values and Hues

One thing that’s good to learn when it comes to B/W valuepainting, is that colors have different values (darkness/lightness) compared to each other. The colored ring in the first example shows very saturated and vibrant colors. But when turned to grayscale, we can clearly see which colors have lowest and highest value. (blue is obviously the lowest:3)

This is another tutorial/guide about Corel Painter 12’s “Brush Control Panels” and what it has to offer that photoshop doesn’t.

If you’ve ever used Sai, you might know about a function that makes the brushstrokes “slow” when placing them - which makes them also smoother and less uneven.
This is awesome, but sadly, SAI is not available for Mac users.
And also, there’s an extension called “Lazy Mouse” that can be used in photoshop that works the same way.
- That is awesome too, but Lazy Mouse is not available for Mac users either.
………….. sometimes, life is unfair if you are a mac user (like me).

BUT DO NOT FRET, MY FRIEND.
Corel Painter 12 will come to the rescue!

I’m gonna show you about the lovely "damping"-setting and why you will love it and abuse it every time you wanna make lineart.
First, pick a brush that you use for lineart (I use Cover Pencil).
Then go to the “Spacing”-panel:

NOTE the Damping-option in the middle. That’s where the magic happens.
Now. Most tools have the damping set to 50%-80%.
But if you set the damping to 90%-100%, you will notice that the strokes are a bit slowed down; think of it a little bit like when photoshop lags and the brush strokes take one-two seconds to complete. But with damping, it’s of course much easier to control this.
Now, here’s a comparison between 1% damping and 100% damping:

(SRSLY JUST LOOK AT THE HEARTS. THE DIFFERENCE IS LIEK….hgngngngngng!!)
After some experimenting with drawing different kinds of shapes, with varying speed and velocity, I came to the conclusion that I prefer 95% damping. 100% is a little bit too slow for me - but might come in handy if you are going to make a very long stroke that you wanna have lots of control over.

And here’s the “Con’s and Pro’s” for this feature. It’s nearly impossible to sketch quickly with a high damping, since the strokes are slowed down. So I suggest that you make one brush for lineart - With 93-100% damping, and one brush for sketching - 60%-80% damping.

I hope this will come in handy for all the Corel users out there<3

This is another tutorial/guide about Corel Painter 12’s “Brush Control Panels” and what it has to offer that photoshop doesn’t.

If you’ve ever used Sai, you might know about a function that makes the brushstrokes “slow” when placing them - which makes them also smoother and less uneven.

This is awesome, but sadly, SAI is not available for Mac users.

And also, there’s an extension called “Lazy Mouse” that can be used in photoshop that works the same way.

- That is awesome too, but Lazy Mouse is not available for Mac users either.

………….. sometimes, life is unfair if you are a mac user (like me).
BUT DO NOT FRET, MY FRIEND.
Corel Painter 12 will come to the rescue!

I’m gonna show you about the lovely "damping"-setting and why you will love it and abuse it every time you wanna make lineart.

First, pick a brush that you use for lineart (I use Cover Pencil).

Then go to the “Spacing”-panel:

NOTE the Damping-option in the middle. That’s where the magic happens.

Now. Most tools have the damping set to 50%-80%.

But if you set the damping to 90%-100%, you will notice that the strokes are a bit slowed down; think of it a little bit like when photoshop lags and the brush strokes take one-two seconds to complete. But with damping, it’s of course much easier to control this.

Now, here’s a comparison between 1% damping and 100% damping:

(SRSLY JUST LOOK AT THE HEARTS. THE DIFFERENCE IS LIEK….hgngngngngng!!)

After some experimenting with drawing different kinds of shapes, with varying speed and velocity, I came to the conclusion that I prefer 95% damping. 100% is a little bit too slow for me - but might come in handy if you are going to make a very long stroke that you wanna have lots of control over.

And here’s the “Con’s and Pro’s” for this feature. It’s nearly impossible to sketch quickly with a high damping, since the strokes are slowed down. So I suggest that you make one brush for lineart - With 93-100% damping, and one brush for sketching - 60%-80% damping.

I hope this will come in handy for all the Corel users out there<3

Maybe it is just because I was simply too lazy to look up what the meaning of &#8220;velocity&#8221; was in my own language (swedish), but I&#8217;ve wondered what Corel Painter&#8217;s brush tracking meant when displaying a certain amount of &#8220;velocity&#8221; (among other things) after analyzing my brush strokes. Now that I know it more or less means &#8220;speed&#8221;, I discovered more possibilities that Corel Painter has.

Velocity means more or less that depending on how quick you place the strokes, the setting will adjust the stroke after it. The picture above displays how it looks like if I set the size expression to "velocity" instead of the very common &#8220;pen pressure&#8221;. This setting is really good if you don&#8217;t own a professional stylus, intuos or other fancy tablets with very good pressure sensitivity.
So instead of controlling the size with pen pressure, you can control it with the speed of your strokes. In my opinion, I think this feels much more closer to traditional painting/drawing.
Now, for you who use Corel Painter XI and higher, here&#8217;s screenshots of the setting on the brush I showed:

I use Oils - Smeary Round as base brush, since I like it&#8217;s&#8230;smeariness :&#8217;D

It&#8217;s important that you set it to Static bristle

Also note that you can reverse the velocity; just click the icon right next to the Expression scroll bar.

"Enable Brush Calibration" is a new feature in the latest version of Corel Painter 12.
For you who are used to Corel Painter might know about the Brush Tracker, when you use it, all brushes will adapt after your personal pressure, velocity and so on.
But if you enable "Brush Calibration", then you can set custom settings to the brush so it isn&#8217;t affected by the Brush Tracking.
Static Bristle:
Here&#8217;s the reason why you should&#8217;ve set the Dab type to Static bristle, this is the window where you have more options that are only available for brushes with the same dab type.
(all other dab types have their own custom setting as well)
Okay then, I think that is all you need to know&#8230;. oh there&#8217;s one more thing:

Maybe it is just because I was simply too lazy to look up what the meaning of “velocity” was in my own language (swedish), but I’ve wondered what Corel Painter’s brush tracking meant when displaying a certain amount of “velocity” (among other things) after analyzing my brush strokes. Now that I know it more or less means “speed”, I discovered more possibilities that Corel Painter has.

Velocity means more or less that depending on how quick you place the strokes, the setting will adjust the stroke after it. The picture above displays how it looks like if I set the size expression to "velocity" instead of the very common “pen pressure”. This setting is really good if you don’t own a professional stylus, intuos or other fancy tablets with very good pressure sensitivity.

So instead of controlling the size with pen pressure, you can control it with the speed of your strokes. In my opinion, I think this feels much more closer to traditional painting/drawing.

Now, for you who use Corel Painter XI and higher, here’s screenshots of the setting on the brush I showed:


I use Oils - Smeary Round as base brush, since I like it’s…smeariness :’D

It’s important that you set it to Static bristle

Also note that you can reverse the velocity; just click the icon right next to the Expression scroll bar.

"Enable Brush Calibration" is a new feature in the latest version of Corel Painter 12.

For you who are used to Corel Painter might know about the Brush Tracker, when you use it, all brushes will adapt after your personal pressure, velocity and so on.

But if you enable "Brush Calibration", then you can set custom settings to the brush so it isn’t affected by the Brush Tracking.

Static Bristle:

Here’s the reason why you should’ve set the Dab type to Static bristle, this is the window where you have more options that are only available for brushes with the same dab type.

(all other dab types have their own custom setting as well)

Okay then, I think that is all you need to know…. oh there’s one more thing:

That is a very good question!
Finding a third component to a complementary color scheme is a problem that occured me many times when I tried out color theory the first times.
Luckily, we have plenty of resources on the internet. My favourite color resource is The Gamut Mask Tool &lt;&#8212;- that is a link. Click it to get to the Mask Tool.
Now this will probably be a little bit like basic math - but with colors.
Since we already have two colors, we only need a third - therefore we should use a triangle as guide for the Gamut Mask Tool:

The corners are the areas where the PRIMARY colors are. But let&#8217;s first adjust the triangle and show the colors Orange and Blue.

The picture above now shows the complementary colors orange and blue. Now, how do we find a third color that fits both orange and blue?
ANSWER:

The third corner here can be used as the secondary color.
PRIMARY COLOR: Colors that are dominant and most used in a picture. If you wanna create a &#8220;harmony&#8221; in your painting (which most artists do want), I recommend you to not use more than 3 primary colors.
SECONDARY COLOR: Non-Dominant colors that are often used for transitions, midtones or as a neutral hue that is neither &#8220;cool" or "warm&#8221;. (And yes, you can use more than one color as secondary colors.)
BUT! There&#8217;s a BUT here!
Don&#8217;t you think that the color wheel is a bit&#8230;. dark?
Let&#8217;s try changing the color wheel to Yurmby!

If you&#8217;ve ever felt confused when it comes to color wheels - that different tutorials shows different color wheels. Then this is the answer. There are actually two different color wheels!! *DUN DUN DUUUN*
 James Gurney, the creator behind The Gamut Mask Tool and author behind the book &#8220;Color and Light&#8221; (that I srsly recommend you to buy, it&#8217;s pretty cheap) explain the differences between the Yurmby wheel and the Munsell wheel.
The Munsell Wheel is more or less based on ten evenly spaced spectral hues(Yellow, green-yellow, green, green-yellow and so on&#8230;) and is the color wheel that most artists are used to.
The Yurmby Wheel is created by placing out the primaries RED, GREEN and BLUE evenly between the other primaries YELLOW, MAGENTA and CYAN. This wheels contains more or less six main primaries that is more accurate on a mathematically level.
Both color wheels can be used in art, however, I am not sure if it&#8217;s a good idea to combine them with each other.

This version is much more brighter, so if you don&#8217;t wanna cause a headache you can do this:

It is important to make use of things as VALUES (light/darkness of a certain color) and SATURATION (the amount of headache you will get by looking at a color)
I don&#8217;t know if I answered your question, this ended up as a tutorial in how to use that Gamut Mask tool heh&#8230; but I guess you might find the answer by using it? :&#8217;D

That is a very good question!

Finding a third component to a complementary color scheme is a problem that occured me many times when I tried out color theory the first times.

Luckily, we have plenty of resources on the internet. My favourite color resource is The Gamut Mask Tool <—- that is a link. Click it to get to the Mask Tool.

Now this will probably be a little bit like basic math - but with colors.

Since we already have two colors, we only need a third - therefore we should use a triangle as guide for the Gamut Mask Tool:

The corners are the areas where the PRIMARY colors are. But let’s first adjust the triangle and show the colors Orange and Blue.

The picture above now shows the complementary colors orange and blue. Now, how do we find a third color that fits both orange and blue?

ANSWER:

The third corner here can be used as the secondary color.

PRIMARY COLOR: Colors that are dominant and most used in a picture. If you wanna create a “harmony” in your painting (which most artists do want), I recommend you to not use more than 3 primary colors.

SECONDARY COLOR: Non-Dominant colors that are often used for transitions, midtones or as a neutral hue that is neither “cool" or "warm”. (And yes, you can use more than one color as secondary colors.)

BUT! There’s a BUT here!

Don’t you think that the color wheel is a bit…. dark?

Let’s try changing the color wheel to Yurmby!

If you’ve ever felt confused when it comes to color wheels - that different tutorials shows different color wheels. Then this is the answer. There are actually two different color wheels!! *DUN DUN DUUUN*

 James Gurney, the creator behind The Gamut Mask Tool and author behind the book “Color and Light” (that I srsly recommend you to buy, it’s pretty cheap) explain the differences between the Yurmby wheel and the Munsell wheel.

The Munsell Wheel is more or less based on ten evenly spaced spectral hues(Yellow, green-yellow, green, green-yellow and so on…) and is the color wheel that most artists are used to.

The Yurmby Wheel is created by placing out the primaries RED, GREEN and BLUE evenly between the other primaries YELLOW, MAGENTA and CYAN. This wheels contains more or less six main primaries that is more accurate on a mathematically level.

Both color wheels can be used in art, however, I am not sure if it’s a good idea to combine them with each other.

This version is much more brighter, so if you don’t wanna cause a headache you can do this:

It is important to make use of things as VALUES (light/darkness of a certain color) and SATURATION (the amount of headache you will get by looking at a color)

I don’t know if I answered your question, this ended up as a tutorial in how to use that Gamut Mask tool heh… but I guess you might find the answer by using it? :’D

Here’s another try on Tarzans anatomy. This time it’s not so much about the proportions that’s wrong with the first picture - it is quite okay if we ignore the left arm.

However, what I find a bit wrong is that it has the wrong “sense of movement”. Even though it IS more sketchy than the second one, it look more like he’s sliding. And is sort of grabbing the branch rather than using it as support for his body weight.

On the second try, I kept all this in mind and started with sketching the branch instead of the character. If the reference is interacting with an object, you really should include it in your sketch. One note I did was that Tarzan is actually not sliding but is sort of in the middle of a jump over the branch (the rest of it is outside the “camera”) while having one part of the body facing a bit more to the right (like the leg).

My best solution to achieve this feeling on my sketch was to make it look like his left arm is supporting the main body weight - gravity plays a big part when it comes to dynamic movement and posing.

Now, it’s a very small difference between Nr1 and Nr2. Especially at first glance, but it’s when you change your main focus that you’ll learn how to make it better.

I call this technique “Painting with Light”

If people could see the process of my paintings more often, they would probably understand why I dislike using the term “shading” on paintings like these.

It’s not the shadows - but the light - that makes something visible for the eye.

DISCLAIMER: Boobies can vary in maany different shapes and sizes, both natural and fake boobies. The illustrations shown does not promise this goes for every single boobie out there. But it should cover most boobies. NOW GO DRAW BOOBIES<3

(well except the one about gravity - I am very sure about that one at least.)

my references: My own boobies, many life drawing studies, hentai and porn.

HEY WANNA LEARN TO DRAW HANDS?! LEARN TO DRAW THE FUCKING THUMB RIGHT FIRST OF ALL.

No really.

I’ve seen many many artists, including myself, being able to draw “okay” hands - but the thumb always ends up weird like this:

In many MANY examples of hands, the thumb is drawn like it was this big lump of “something” lacking one or any joints at all.

Hands in general, are more or less a big bunch of joints, so if you don’t keep that in mind when drawing, you might end up with weird fingers. SO PAY ATTENTION TO THE GODDANG JOINTS OKAY?!

NOW THIS IS HOW IT SHOULD LOOK LIKE:

(to get the book as pdf: JUST GOOGLE “BRIDGMAN CONSTRUCTIVE ANATOMY” and you’ll find the website with the download link)


In order to easier draw the thumb (and the rest of the hand as well) is to exaggerate the shapes and features. That is the “key” to understand how anatomy can vary so much but still follow the same basic construction:

Aaaaand here’s some more examples of DELICIOUS THUMBS:


THERE.

NOW GO AND DRAW THUMBS!

(with boobies)

DISCLAIMER: Baby-hands and hands on more overweight people tend to not be as "bony" as in my examples shown here. But they are still divided in the same pattern, but slightly rounder.

Bob Ross - Watch his videos!

I think his videos are incredibly helpful also for digital painting. If we start see the screen with pixels just like we see a canvas of pigments - that’s when you’ll understand how single-layer painting works.

I will upload more Bob Ross-videos. They are all pretty short if you search on youtube. He breaks it down so easily. SO WATCH THIS GODDANGIT.

Minitutorial: How to make a nice, sharp brush for lineart in Photoshop

I like sharp lines when I make lineart digitally. But I don’t think the default “hard-round” brush is that sharp enough for my taste. And I really don’t wanna resize my images too much just to make the lineart appear sharper.

So I discovered how you can make the brush a bit more sharper, but not too sharp so it would look like it was made in Microsoft Paint…

First off, make sure that you set the spacing to 1%. (I do this to more or less all my brushes since I don’t like how the spacing look when you set a lower flow/pressure setting)

After that, check the box “Texture” and then under the options check the box “Texture each tip” and have 100% depth. This is was makes the brush a bit more sharp - this is much better than adding the “noise” effect.

And here’s some comparing examples of the brush:

Using the Fill Bucket is also a bit better with the custom-brush than with the default. (Note the thin, light line between the black and the red on the example to the left.)

Now go make sweet lineart!

A quick analyze of how the hips affect the shape of the thighs - which also affect the main difference between a masculine or feminine body shape.
(Masculine legs are based on Glen Keane&#8217;s design of Disney&#8217;s Tarzan - which btw IS anatomically correct if we exclude the size of the head and so on.)
Disclaimer: I don&#8217;t think &#8220;exaggerated&#8221; was the right word for those legs. &#8220;Slimmed down&#8221; would probably be more correct. Anyway&#8230;

A quick analyze of how the hips affect the shape of the thighs - which also affect the main difference between a masculine or feminine body shape.

(Masculine legs are based on Glen Keane’s design of Disney’s Tarzan - which btw IS anatomically correct if we exclude the size of the head and so on.)

Disclaimer: I don’t think “exaggerated” was the right word for those legs. “Slimmed down” would probably be more correct. Anyway…

A simple illustration showing one of the most common mistakes some anime/cartoon artists do - a too small skull for the head.

A simple illustration showing one of the most common mistakes some anime/cartoon artists do - a too small skull for the head.


It&#8217;s okay, english is not my native language either but I totally get what you mean :3
Hmmm it&#8217;s a very good question. I actually had to take a look at my oldest drawings in order to find out how and where I actually started painting single-layer style.
Due to certain circumstances when I was younger, I used programs like Oekakiboards to make my pictures. And those programs have a lot of limitations.
When I couldn&#8217;t have more than 1 or 2 layers, I pushed myself and got used to have all the colors on the same layer.
Also, I went to art school in High School - where I got to try out tradition opaque-paint (oils, acrylics, guache etc) which was very fun. When I got Corel Painter, it had some limitations as well (the latest version has a lot of improvements tho) but thanks to the blender-tool in Corel, as well as my basic knowledge for traditional drawing/painting, I started with shapes and silhouettes instead of lineart. I soon learned that I actually have more control over the painting when it wasn&#8217;t &#8220;trapped in a lineart&#8221;. If I saw that the hand looks odd, I can easily re-paint it - if you have a lineart in that situation, you would have to first re-draw the lineart and then adjust the color-layers and so on.
Also, lineart doesn&#8217;t exist in reality - the closest to lineart are actually tiny shadows between folds, cracks etc.
I often start with a silhouette, and then maybe I do a rough sketch to get the proportions right. And then I just paint over the areas where you would normally have lineart.
However, one of the first techniques that probably helped me out was this one:

You start with the sketch - or lineart, it&#8217;s not so important to have the lineart perfectly cleaned since it will be removed later.

Next, on a layer below it, you add the values and colors. it is important to include light and shadow as well. At this stage, I very often reduce the opacity of the lineart-layer.

Now I delete the lineart layer, and voilá! I have a pair of lips without lineart!
This technique was the first one I used for this. Later on, I started with silhouettes and values. But I think this might be a good technique for those who really REALLY have a hard time grasping the whole concept.

It’s okay, english is not my native language either but I totally get what you mean :3

Hmmm it’s a very good question. I actually had to take a look at my oldest drawings in order to find out how and where I actually started painting single-layer style.

Due to certain circumstances when I was younger, I used programs like Oekakiboards to make my pictures. And those programs have a lot of limitations.

When I couldn’t have more than 1 or 2 layers, I pushed myself and got used to have all the colors on the same layer.

Also, I went to art school in High School - where I got to try out tradition opaque-paint (oils, acrylics, guache etc) which was very fun. When I got Corel Painter, it had some limitations as well (the latest version has a lot of improvements tho) but thanks to the blender-tool in Corel, as well as my basic knowledge for traditional drawing/painting, I started with shapes and silhouettes instead of lineart. I soon learned that I actually have more control over the painting when it wasn’t “trapped in a lineart”. If I saw that the hand looks odd, I can easily re-paint it - if you have a lineart in that situation, you would have to first re-draw the lineart and then adjust the color-layers and so on.

Also, lineart doesn’t exist in reality - the closest to lineart are actually tiny shadows between folds, cracks etc.

I often start with a silhouette, and then maybe I do a rough sketch to get the proportions right. And then I just paint over the areas where you would normally have lineart.

However, one of the first techniques that probably helped me out was this one:

You start with the sketch - or lineart, it’s not so important to have the lineart perfectly cleaned since it will be removed later.

Next, on a layer below it, you add the values and colors. it is important to include light and shadow as well. At this stage, I very often reduce the opacity of the lineart-layer.

Now I delete the lineart layer, and voilá! I have a pair of lips without lineart!

This technique was the first one I used for this. Later on, I started with silhouettes and values. But I think this might be a good technique for those who really REALLY have a hard time grasping the whole concept.

A character sheet for Miré. I am obviously inspired by all the disney/dreamworks animation sheets I&#8217;ve been browsing around. But they inspire me to start taking notes on my sketches. (Which I strongly recommend)
Somehow I sort of started to like drawing Miré quite a bit while doing these. To be honest i&#8217;ve never really found any interesting characteristic in her before. But I think she&#8217;s starting to breathe on her own.
I think it was a good idea to give her a undercut, instead of the mohawk she used to have, the mohawk is a bit too cocky and punk to fit Miré&#8217;s personality (which is uh&#8230; I dunno. But it&#8217;s not cocky and punk at least&#8230;)
I recommend you guys who make your own OC&#8217;s and comics to do sheets like these, do several sketches of the face in different angles, expressions in different angles and so on. AND TAKE NOTES!
One of the more important things to consider is when the character has a unique haircut that might cover one part of the face - make sure to do a design that will be able to show the face on both sides in profile. And not ending up with one side covered with hair - that&#8217;s one thing you certainly should avoid when animating or making comics, because you will end up drawing the character showing the same side of the face all the time - and you do not want that. 
(Unless you do comic strips shown in the same angle all the time with only 3-4 panels)

A character sheet for Miré. I am obviously inspired by all the disney/dreamworks animation sheets I’ve been browsing around. But they inspire me to start taking notes on my sketches. (Which I strongly recommend)

Somehow I sort of started to like drawing Miré quite a bit while doing these. To be honest i’ve never really found any interesting characteristic in her before. But I think she’s starting to breathe on her own.

I think it was a good idea to give her a undercut, instead of the mohawk she used to have, the mohawk is a bit too cocky and punk to fit Miré’s personality (which is uh… I dunno. But it’s not cocky and punk at least…)

I recommend you guys who make your own OC’s and comics to do sheets like these, do several sketches of the face in different angles, expressions in different angles and so on. AND TAKE NOTES!

One of the more important things to consider is when the character has a unique haircut that might cover one part of the face - make sure to do a design that will be able to show the face on both sides in profile. And not ending up with one side covered with hair - that’s one thing you certainly should avoid when animating or making comics, because you will end up drawing the character showing the same side of the face all the time - and you do not want that.

(Unless you do comic strips shown in the same angle all the time with only 3-4 panels)

A quick step-by-step in how I draw a hyena-head in profile. Using the egg-shape really helps out in order to create that special shape you see in profile.