Mirre's personal artblog
A 24 year old human who likes to draw stuff, especially comics. This is my personal artblog where I will post doodles, WIPs and finished artwork and also text posts with ignorant opinions. I'm doing my best. Enjoy your stay!
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Guide to reprinting artwork from pixiv, etc.

chitanda:

So I decided to put this in a separate post because people seem to ask about it a lot and it’d probably be really nice if this could be spread around!

When wanting to use someone else’s artwork online, it really is truly bothersome to have to ask every time you’d want to use someone else’s art. Most artists don’t mind having their art used as long as there is credit, but some artists strictly want permission first.

Please keep in mind that always assuming that it’s not okay is the best mindset.

It’s best to be sure and just message, but if you’re really trying to avoid asking, then it is best to do the following before surely asking:

  1. Check their pixiv profile or blog profile where it says anything about redistribution. Usually just turning on the Google Translator will suffice, since it’s usually just a really simple sentence.
  2. Read the art description about redistribution. Turning on Google Translator will suffice as well as it’ll easily pick up.
  3. Check for these things: ※ These are kind of like Japanese asterisks, where they’re usually used as warnings or cautions and all that.
  4. If you’ve/someone else received a warning from an artist before saying that you’re not allowed to, please do not redistribute their art any more. Even if it they won’t be able to see it, doing it behind their back is downright rude. If it’s a rumor and you’re not sure, please message.

If the first two are checked, then it’s fairly safe to assume that the artist wouldn’t mind having their art distributed with proper sourcing.

But if you’d like to double check, here’s some phrases you can use when asking for permission.

If you want to repost/distribute art, you could send them something like:

[art link here]

この画像に配布してもいいですか?返答おねがいします!ありがとうございます。(Is it okay to distribute this picture? Please reply! Thank you.)

If you want to use the art to make something else with it, you could send:

[art link here]

この画像でいろいろ作ってもいいですか?返答おねがいします!ありがとうございます。(Is it okay to make something with this picture? Please reply! Thank you.)

If you’d want to add that you cannot speak Japanese, add in:

日本語を話しません。ごめんなさい。(I can’t speak Japanese. I’m sorry.)

If the artist replies to you in Japanese, Google Translate is your best bet since replies will just either say simple “yes” or “no” phrases.

It is best to be able to register into Japanese art sites first since most sites require accounts before messaging, and there are several tutorials online where it tells you directions in English on how to register on a Japanese site.

Just got Corel Painter for the first time? Here’s a list of tips in what to do before starting to paint:

foervraengd:

A quick guide in what to do first of all with corel painter:

First go to preferences, this is the settings you should have in order to make sure you have as good performance as possible. This is the preferences for painter 12, so if some of the options is not available in your version, then you can just skip it.:

  • on the interface menu, make sure you do NOT have “enchanted brush ghost” selected. Pick only “brush ghost”. This increase the performance a lot by some weird reason.
  • After that, go to “performance”, if you have an external harddrive connected to your computer, select that drive as “scratch disc”(you can do this with photoshop as well).
  • If you have more than 1 multicore, then lower the number. Do NOT set multicore on max, since that will make Corel lag if you run other programs (such as iTunes) in the background.
  • Also uncheck the boxes “smooth objects when zooming” and “increase drawing speed when zoomed out”.
  • Another thing that is good to know is that if you work on a picture where the file is on a external harddrive or USB, it can also make the program lag. So make sure that all your .RIF-workfiles are on the computers own harddrive.

Interface settings:

If you work on a painting and you notice that the black on the canvas is actually not 100% black, then you should go to CANVAS> Color Management Settings.

  • If the default RGB profile is set to “sRGB IEC61966-2-1 noBPC” then you just change it to “withBPC” in the drop-down menu. “BPC” stands for “Black Point Correction” and is a setting you should only use if the drawing/painting is going to be printed(like a comic page for example). But otherwise, you won’t need it. This is very common thing that people stumble upon with Corel that they don’t know how to fix. So now you know it already.
  • Make sure to have “color proofing mode” turned OFF when you start on a new painting.
  • If you have Painter 12, then you can create your own “brush pallet” by simply holding shift and then click+drag the selected brush onto the workspace. Having a brush palette is very handy since you won’t need to use the drop-down menu for the brushes. In older versions, you only need to click and drag.
  • GO SET UP THE BRUSH TRACKER!!!!! You’ll find it in Preferences>Brush Tracking. I cannot stress you guys enough about how important this is in order to get good pen pressure on your brushes. If you feel like the velocity/pen pressure isn’t looking like you expect, then go and edit the brush tracker. All you need to do is to draw some lines on the window like you’d usually do when drawing.

Since there’s so few guides out there in how to set up Painter for beginners, I made this little guide. Many of these tips are important for the performance. People who aren’t aware of these things will often give up on using corel since it might start to lag and similar things. But if you fix these things mentioned, you’ll have the program running much better.

Reblogging again after I realized that I made this very huge mistake with the color management settings. So this should be the accurate info.

My Art Study Exercise-list (updated: July 18th)

foervraengd:

So… I like to exercise and practice my art skills a lot recently. However, it’s important to not be too overwhelmed with all the areas that you need to cover.

Therefore, I’m going to make a little list of what areas I should practice on. This is mostly just a thing for myself, but if you find this useful you can share it with others as well.

So whenever I feel like doing a study, but don’t know what area to cover, I am going to look at this list and see what area I haven’t worked on lately. Alt making a “schedule” where I cover each area a day.

A good idea is to cover one area each day, and then fill one whole page/spread/canvas with studies on each subject within that category.

And by “fill” I mean as in as much as there’s space on the paper. Not just 1 or 3 sketches, but maybe I dunno… 10 or 20! depends on the subject of course, but repitition is important in order to improve your artistic skills!

The three first areas are what I’ll consider most important to always practice on.

Important Basics:

  • Value study, work with grayscale/combine with composition
  • Color theory studies. Use still life and photographic references
  • Perspective and composition
  • Different surface/texture (metallic objects, drapery study etc)
  • Still life study on static objects/photographs

Anatomy:

  • Gesture drawing
  • Muscle/skeleton study
  • Faces and facial diversity (ethnics, age etc)
  • Female/Male differences
  • Bodyshapes/age

Environments/backgrounds:

  • Nature - forests, mountains, deserts etc
  • Plants, trees and geology
  • Urban - architecture buldings, monuments etc
  • Speedpaintings/thumbnail exercises (10-30 minutes long)
Advanced/in-depth:

Technical:

  • Vehicles; boats, cars, airplanes etc
  • Weapons; guns, swords, bows etc
  • Modern vehicles/weapons
  • Historical vehicles/weapons
  • Machines, engines, robots etc

Animals:

  • Herbivore mammals (horse, cows, deers etc)
  • Carnivore mammals (lions, wolfs, bears etc)
  • Rodents (mice, squirrels, rabbits etc)
  • Birds
  • Reptiles and Amphibians (lizards, snakes, frogs etc)
  • Aquatic animals (fish, sharks, whales etc)
  • Insects, spiders and other invertebrates
  • DINOSAURS!!!!1 (+ other prehistoric animals)
  • Mythological animals (don’t stick to “modern” illustrations, go for the very very old designs!!)

Design/culture:

  • Modern/historical fashion (shoes, dresses, suits etc)
  • Armor and defense (for both humans and animals)
  • Furniture and interior design (modern/historical)
  • Gadgets, jewelry and other decorations
  • Small items like glasses, plates, spoons etc

I will probably expand the list sooner or later. Please note that “drapery study” is more or less studies on clothes and folds. Hair is something I personally don’t feel the complete need to exercise on. Since there’s more important areas to cover as well.

UPDATE Jul 18th 2012:


For those who wanna hardcore-exercise should spend at least two to three days focusing on one area/subject:

  • First day is studies using references and research about the subject.
  • Second day is drawing the subject freehanded without using references. 
  • Third day is to make a finished painting/drawing that includes/focus on the specific subject.

My Art Study Exercise-list

So… I like to exercise and practice my art skills a lot recently. However, it’s important to not be too overwhelmed with all the areas that you need to cover.

Therefore, I’m going to make a little list of what areas I should practice on. This is mostly just a thing for myself, but if you find this useful you can share it with others as well.

So whenever I feel like doing a study, but don’t know what area to cover, I am going to look at this list and see what area I haven’t worked on lately. Alt making a “schedule” where I cover each area a day.

A good idea is to cover one area each day, and then fill one whole page/spread/canvas with studies on each subject within that category.

And by “fill” I mean as in as much as there’s space on the paper. Not just 1 or 3 sketches, but maybe I dunno… 10 or 20! depends on the subject of course, but repitition is important in order to improve your artistic skills!

The three first areas are what I’ll consider most important to always practice on.

Important Basics:

  • Value study, work with grayscale/combine with composition
  • Color theory studies. Use still life and photographic references
  • Perspective and composition
  • Different surface/texture (metallic objects, drapery study etc)
  • Still life study on static objects/photographs

Anatomy:

  • Gesture drawing
  • Muscle/skeleton study
  • Faces and facial diversity (ethnics, age etc)
  • Female/Male differences
  • Bodyshapes/age

Environments/backgrounds:

  • Nature - forests, mountains, deserts etc
  • Plants, trees and geology
  • Urban - architecture buldings, monuments etc
  • Speedpaintings/thumbnail exercises (10-30 minutes long)
Advanced/in-depth:

Technical:

  • Vehicles; boats, cars, airplanes etc
  • Weapons; guns, swords, bows etc
  • Modern vehicles/weapons
  • Historical vehicles/weapons
  • Machines, engines, robots etc

Animals:

  • Herbivore mammals (horse, cows, deers etc)
  • Carnivore mammals (lions, wolfs, bears etc)
  • Rodents (mice, squirrels, rabbits etc)
  • Birds
  • Reptiles and Amphibians (lizards, snakes, frogs etc)
  • Aquatic animals (fish, sharks, whales etc)
  • Insects, spiders and other invertebrates
  • DINOSAURS!!!!1 (+ other prehistoric animals)
  • Mythological animals (don’t stick to “modern” illustrations, go for the very very old designs!!)

Design/culture:

  • Modern/historical fashion (shoes, dresses, suits etc)
  • Armor and defense (for both humans and animals)
  • Furniture and interior design (modern/historical)
  • Gadgets, jewelry and other decorations
  • Small items like glasses, plates, spoons etc

I will probably expand the list sooner or later. Please note that “drapery study” is more or less studies on clothes and folds. Hair is something I personally don’t feel the complete need to exercise on. Since there’s more important areas to cover as well.

Just got Corel Painter for the first time? Here’s a list of tips in what to do before starting to paint:

A quick guide in what to do first of all with corel painter:

First go to preferences, this is the settings you should have in order to make sure you have as good performance as possible. This is the preferences for painter 12, so if some of the options is not available in your version, then you can just skip it.:

  • on the interface menu, make sure you do NOT have “enchanted brush ghost” selected. Pick only “brush ghost”. This increase the performance a lot by some weird reason.
  • After that, go to “performance”, if you have an external harddrive connected to your computer, select that drive as “scratch disc”(you can do this with photoshop as well).
  • If you have more than 1 multicore, then lower the number. Do NOT set multicore on max, since that will make Corel lag if you run other programs (such as iTunes) in the background.
  • Also uncheck the boxes “smooth objects when zooming" and "increase drawing speed when zoomed out”.
  • Another thing that is good to know is that if you work on a picture where the file is on a external harddrive or USB, it can also make the program lag. So make sure that all your .RIF-workfiles are on the computers own harddrive.

Interface settings:

If you work on a painting and you notice that the black on the canvas is actually not 100% black, then you should go to CANVAS> Color Management Settings.

  • If the default RGB profile is set to “sRGB IEC61966-2-1 noBPC" then you just change it to “withBPC” in the drop-down menu. “BPC” stands for "Black Point Correction" and is a setting you should only use if the drawing/painting is going to be printed(like a comic page for example). But otherwise, you won’t need it. This is very common thing that people stumble upon with Corel that they don’t know how to fix. So now you know it already.
  • Make sure to have “color proofing mode” turned OFF when you start on a new painting.
  • If you have Painter 12, then you can create your own “brush pallet” by simply holding shift and then click+drag the selected brush onto the workspace. Having a brush palette is very handy since you won’t need to use the drop-down menu for the brushes. In older versions, you only need to click and drag.
  • GO SET UP THE BRUSH TRACKER!!!!! You’ll find it in Preferences>Brush Tracking. I cannot stress you guys enough about how important this is in order to get good pen pressure on your brushes. If you feel like the velocity/pen pressure isn’t looking like you expect, then go and edit the brush tracker. All you need to do is to draw some lines on the window like you’d usually do when drawing.

Since there’s so few guides out there in how to set up Painter for beginners, I made this little guide. Many of these tips are important for the performance. People who aren’t aware of these things will often give up on using corel since it might start to lag and similar things. But if you fix these things mentioned, you’ll have the program running much better.

A redline correction/”guide” in how to draw a five year old child. Helped Ninja during the livestream with her drawing and what to think about next time.

I’ve noticed that there’s very little references/resources when it comes to draw children bodies, it’s probably because the thought of a naked child has become so taboo. But if someone has some good resources of drawings of childrens anatomy, it would be nice to know. What I’ve shown here is more or less all I currently know about this subject.

A redline correction/”guide” in how to draw a five year old child. Helped Ninja during the livestream with her drawing and what to think about next time.

I’ve noticed that there’s very little references/resources when it comes to draw children bodies, it’s probably because the thought of a naked child has become so taboo. But if someone has some good resources of drawings of childrens anatomy, it would be nice to know. What I’ve shown here is more or less all I currently know about this subject.

How I draw fists/closed hands from references

Drawing fists is one of the areas I feel like always having most trouble with.

(this is the reference picture I’m going to use in this mini-guide)

Many hand tutorials mention "archs" as a good guide, and I agree with that most of the time - but for fists… it seem to not for for ME (remember people; There’s no 100% flawless technique that works for everyone, and while using archs is very effective for most people, it seem to not help me out as much as I hoped.)



But some days ago, I found my own technique. I’m going to show you by first doing a drawing of a fist, using the picture above as reference.

I start with the wrist, palm and the thumb - since these serves as a “homebase”.

Now I start drawing the knuckles/fingers. I use a little bit of negative-space thinking here, and use the outer silhouette as a start instead. Remember to make sure the silhouette match the reference as good as possible.

And here’s where I use my own technique for the placement of the phalanges. Instead of doing an arch, I sketch out a stair-like path. I check the reference as good as I can while during this.

Sketching out the first set of phalanges.

Let’s observe the reference once again. The red lines show more or less how I think when I use a reference. Using the negativa-space-technique is very effective in this case. The ref lines also shows how you can find “paths” that connects the shape of the palm-muscle with the pinky-finger and so on. This is a good way to think when using references.

End result.

Disclaimer: I honestly don’t know the source from the reference. I got it from one of the 1413524 hand references you find on art-resource-tumblrs. Yes I am a horrible person.

A Guide about Guidelines

If you’ve ever read an art-book or a tutorial online, you should be familiar with “guidelines”. Some people use all kinds of guidelines, while others seems to not need to use them at all - but most artists have or will use them some time in their life as artists.

The main point with guidelines is that they should help you being able to draw the same object in different angles or position, but still keep it’s appearance recognizable. Guidelines are also used in order to easier keep something appear symmetric.

By using diagonal lines, starting from the corners, we can easier find the centre of the area. And as you can see, when the cube is drawn in a certain perspective, the middle-line does not create two equally big parts… that is, if we would view this drawing as something 2-dimensional - which we don’t, of course!

With this in mind, we can use the very same guidelines in all kinds of angles or perspective.

This will also make it easier to keep track on proportions, both for the body and for the face. And since many guidelines we use are based on splitting everything in half to create a center-line, this knowledge is very useful for almost all kinds of techniques in drawing.

Practice sketching down the diagonal lines in order to quickly find the absolute centre of the plane.

You can use a ruler as a start, but it’s recommended to practice this freehand. After a while you will grow used to it and sooner or later you can find the absolute centre all on your own.

(At first I was just gonna fill this post with screenshots. But then I realized that it might be good to be able to edit the text if needed. This is actually from my booklet-version of “understanding anatomy”, but I think this part is so important that I’ll share it with you either way. Hngnng I’m too generous…. lol)

Negative Painting/drawing



This technique is commonly mentioned and used in arts. It’s a great way to use our ability to spot shapes and patterns in things and by doing so we will easier memorize it. Negative painting/drawing is also a good way to check the overall posture by using a black/white contrast.

If you are a self-taught artist and haven’t tried out this technique, I strongly suggest you do - photographs or living models are recommended.

Michael Mentler’s CA thread “Book of Bones” is one of the many great resources I used when I made my “Understanding Anatomy” tutorials. This guy is awesome, and maybe a little crazy at the same time, he calculates and analyze the human body after patterns that makes you think of Leonardi Da Vinci’s old studies.

Oh and his handwriting might be hard to read but it’s so awesome to look at anyway. I hope someone makes a font out of his handwriting ;w;

foervraengd:

I think this should be enough to cover the proportions during growth…

Reblogging my own posts because of reasons.

foervraengd:

I think this should be enough to cover the proportions during growth…

Reblogging my own posts because of reasons.

HEY WANNA LEARN TO DRAW HANDS?! LEARN TO DRAW THE FUCKING PHALANGES RIGHT GODDANGIT!!

This is a little sequel to my older post about the thumb: Small Miniguide about the thumb!

One thing I many times see artist do, is to not really consider the phalanges and knuckles/joints on the fingers.


You will see these kinds of hands on for example…. badly traced bases. Novice artists tend to not pay attention to those small subtle details that can make a hand go from “good” to “wtf”.

REMEMBER PEOPLE:

PINKY-FINGER ALWAYS POINTS INWARDS THE PALM!!

PINKY-FINGER LIKES TO CUDDLE WITH RING-FINGER!!


(and uh… yeah it’s not 100% accurate in the illustration above, PLEASE DONT COPY THAT LITTLE FLAW IT SHOULD BEND A BIT MORE INWARDS. But it looks at least better than the first example. Yeah I know I’m such a professional…..)

Keep this in mind everytime you draw closed hands, fists and other poses where the fingers are not stretched out.

So, since the pinky points a bit inwards, there’s a little bit of foreshortening on the phalanges. And this is one of those small subtle details some people don’t notice.

Now, once you’ve learned that you have 3 phalanges and not 2. There’s also another important mistake ppl do with fingers:

The top phalange (aka fingertip) are sometimes drawn shorter than it is, making the middle phalange appear too long.

REMEMBER: You don’t bend only your fingertips when holding stuff and such. In fact, bending the fingertips 90 degrees with the rest of the phalanges straight is very hard and is not a natural way to move the fingers. (try it yourself, most of you wont be able to do it. But some can do it, as a party-trick.)

The bottom phalange is slightly longer than the middle phalange, sometimes they appear as having the same length. But always make sure to not make them twice as long as the top phalange. Think of their lengths as a pyramid; base is large while top is narrow.

And as a final note, I’ll talk a little bit about the fingernails.

The nails never cover the whole top phalange, it cover about half of it but rarely any longer. Nails can be smaller as well, it depends on what finger it is. And of course, there’s always exceptions.



Now go draw correct phalanges!

Floor Plans



This video is done by the same guy I posted before. This one is even more handy if you really struggle with interior like rooms and hate placing out vanishing points first + it’s a good practice in how to plan out the design and objects of the interior.

"Introduction to Landscapes"


Now this video shows a very interesting technique in how to quickly put down the perspective by using circles. Have to try out this technique as soon as possible!

Painting with light - quickest way to practice realistic faces.

Painting with “light” is super effective, since we will instantly recognize a natural face with just placing the strokes on the main areas of the face.

The forehead, cheekbones and nosebridge are the first areas to appear when we place the light source above.

After those comes the muzzle around the mouth, under lip and the chin.

Now here’s something interesting:

This is something that I noticed long ago when i was playing with a lamp. If we remove the nose, the face will appear looking more like a skull.

The human face doesn’t have as much fat as other parts of the body, and the muscles consist of pretty thin layers - leaving the skeletal structure closer to the skin and therefore reveals it’s shape more than other parts of our body.

Keep this in mind next time you practice realistic painting/drawing.<3