Mirre's personal artblog
A 24 year old human who likes to draw stuff, especially comics. This is my personal artblog where I will post doodles, WIPs and finished artwork and also text posts with ignorant opinions. I'm doing my best. Enjoy your stay!
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I love Shaka’s nose. Her nose is prob the best thing I gave her.

I love Shaka’s nose. Her nose is prob the best thing I gave her.

(Source: foervraengd)

"Take a good look, Mike. This is what Kane did to us."

"Take a good look, Mike. This is what Kane did to us."

Ppl asked me about this sweet brush I’ve started to use in Painter.

You just go to Acrylics and choose “Clumpy Thin Flat”.

PROTIP: Play around with the Viscosity, Blend and Wetness sliders. The more blend, the less paint will you have in your strokes, so if you wanna drag long strokes, I suggest you drag down the blend more or less down to 0%.

I like this brush because of personal preference, it works very nice since it first adds paint and then you can blend/smudge it out in one stroke. So it’s not like using a blender with increased resaturation. It fits good for speedpaintings, or if you like a traditional touch on your paintings. Impressionism themed paintings is a good inspiration source for using this brush.

Just got Corel Painter for the first time? Here’s a list of tips in what to do before starting to paint:

foervraengd:

A quick guide in what to do first of all with corel painter:

First go to preferences, this is the settings you should have in order to make sure you have as good performance as possible. This is the preferences for painter 12, so if some of the options is not available in your version, then you can just skip it.:

  • on the interface menu, make sure you do NOT have “enchanted brush ghost” selected. Pick only “brush ghost”. This increase the performance a lot by some weird reason.
  • After that, go to “performance”, if you have an external harddrive connected to your computer, select that drive as “scratch disc”(you can do this with photoshop as well).
  • If you have more than 1 multicore, then lower the number. Do NOT set multicore on max, since that will make Corel lag if you run other programs (such as iTunes) in the background.
  • Also uncheck the boxes “smooth objects when zooming” and “increase drawing speed when zoomed out”.
  • Another thing that is good to know is that if you work on a picture where the file is on a external harddrive or USB, it can also make the program lag. So make sure that all your .RIF-workfiles are on the computers own harddrive.

Interface settings:

If you work on a painting and you notice that the black on the canvas is actually not 100% black, then you should go to CANVAS> Color Management Settings.

  • If the default RGB profile is set to “sRGB IEC61966-2-1 noBPC” then you just change it to “withBPC” in the drop-down menu. “BPC” stands for “Black Point Correction” and is a setting you should only use if the drawing/painting is going to be printed(like a comic page for example). But otherwise, you won’t need it. This is very common thing that people stumble upon with Corel that they don’t know how to fix. So now you know it already.
  • Make sure to have “color proofing mode” turned OFF when you start on a new painting.
  • If you have Painter 12, then you can create your own “brush pallet” by simply holding shift and then click+drag the selected brush onto the workspace. Having a brush palette is very handy since you won’t need to use the drop-down menu for the brushes. In older versions, you only need to click and drag.
  • GO SET UP THE BRUSH TRACKER!!!!! You’ll find it in Preferences>Brush Tracking. I cannot stress you guys enough about how important this is in order to get good pen pressure on your brushes. If you feel like the velocity/pen pressure isn’t looking like you expect, then go and edit the brush tracker. All you need to do is to draw some lines on the window like you’d usually do when drawing.

Since there’s so few guides out there in how to set up Painter for beginners, I made this little guide. Many of these tips are important for the performance. People who aren’t aware of these things will often give up on using corel since it might start to lag and similar things. But if you fix these things mentioned, you’ll have the program running much better.

Reblogging again after I realized that I made this very huge mistake with the color management settings. So this should be the accurate info.

Experimenting in finding a technique that suits me when it comes to paint detailed stuff like foliage in nature.

Please note that the program I use is Corel Painter 12 - not SAI or Photoshop.

I noticed that if I reduced the resaturation of my favourite painting brush to 3-4%, it got more affected by the background color. This is something I appreciate, since I love the thought of giving a painting a certain color theme.

Please note that on the two last pictures, I used the same green colors on each background color. But depending on which background color I use, the “primary and secondary” colors appears as either cooler or warmer.

So, my final conclusion is that it’s ALWAYS a better idea to start with the darkest values, and then add the midtones/highlights afterwards.

The size, shape and length of the strokes will also affect the overall appearance of the foliage. I recommend people who are afraid of painting foliage backgrounds to observe photographs/real life study.

Ask yourself:

- How will a bush/tree/grass look like if I use small and round strokes? And how would long, thin strokes make it appear?

- How would it appear if I used a different color than green for the foliage?

- How many different designs of bushes, grass, plants and trees can I paint/draw without looking at a reference? 

- How can I paint a green forest without the risk to make it appear “monochrome”?

Just got Corel Painter for the first time? Here’s a list of tips in what to do before starting to paint:

A quick guide in what to do first of all with corel painter:

First go to preferences, this is the settings you should have in order to make sure you have as good performance as possible. This is the preferences for painter 12, so if some of the options is not available in your version, then you can just skip it.:

  • on the interface menu, make sure you do NOT have “enchanted brush ghost” selected. Pick only “brush ghost”. This increase the performance a lot by some weird reason.
  • After that, go to “performance”, if you have an external harddrive connected to your computer, select that drive as “scratch disc”(you can do this with photoshop as well).
  • If you have more than 1 multicore, then lower the number. Do NOT set multicore on max, since that will make Corel lag if you run other programs (such as iTunes) in the background.
  • Also uncheck the boxes “smooth objects when zooming" and "increase drawing speed when zoomed out”.
  • Another thing that is good to know is that if you work on a picture where the file is on a external harddrive or USB, it can also make the program lag. So make sure that all your .RIF-workfiles are on the computers own harddrive.

Interface settings:

If you work on a painting and you notice that the black on the canvas is actually not 100% black, then you should go to CANVAS> Color Management Settings.

  • If the default RGB profile is set to “sRGB IEC61966-2-1 noBPC" then you just change it to “withBPC” in the drop-down menu. “BPC” stands for "Black Point Correction" and is a setting you should only use if the drawing/painting is going to be printed(like a comic page for example). But otherwise, you won’t need it. This is very common thing that people stumble upon with Corel that they don’t know how to fix. So now you know it already.
  • Make sure to have “color proofing mode” turned OFF when you start on a new painting.
  • If you have Painter 12, then you can create your own “brush pallet” by simply holding shift and then click+drag the selected brush onto the workspace. Having a brush palette is very handy since you won’t need to use the drop-down menu for the brushes. In older versions, you only need to click and drag.
  • GO SET UP THE BRUSH TRACKER!!!!! You’ll find it in Preferences>Brush Tracking. I cannot stress you guys enough about how important this is in order to get good pen pressure on your brushes. If you feel like the velocity/pen pressure isn’t looking like you expect, then go and edit the brush tracker. All you need to do is to draw some lines on the window like you’d usually do when drawing.

Since there’s so few guides out there in how to set up Painter for beginners, I made this little guide. Many of these tips are important for the performance. People who aren’t aware of these things will often give up on using corel since it might start to lag and similar things. But if you fix these things mentioned, you’ll have the program running much better.

I use the blender brush for painting hair, but I use it more as a way to blur certain areas instead of blending the whole thing.
I always use pointed stump as blender. I made a VERY quick and rough walkthrough to show you how you make realistic hair in painter.
The techniques used in this walkthrough is more or less like many other hair-walkthroughs.

So we start with a dark base, this is for blonde hair. Use the blender with 20% opacity to blend out the edges of the hair.

Now, with the same oil brush (smeary round with dab profile set to “circular”) I sketch out the strands or hair. it’s good if they cross each other a little bit, don’t make the lines too uniform - hair tends to separate into “sections” more or less. Which we will discover soon…

Now it’s time to use the blender. Set the opacity to 10% and decrease the size of the blender (otherwise it will turn out just like you said; lumpy).
MAJOR PROTIP: Blurring the ends of the hair will make it look more realistic and less like spaghetti.

Now it’s time to create these so called “sections” I mentioned earlier. By blending only certain areas, we can create a very realistic result. Blend areas where the light brushstrokes are closer to each other, and leave the darker gaps as they are.

This is how it turned out for me. Please note that the size of the brush matter a lot here, it’s still set to 10% opacity.

Continue like this over the whole area, this is how it turned out for me.

Let’s add some highlights, shall we? Take an even smaller sized brush and place the strokes after the hair structure (very important).
The trick for realistic hair is to pick a certain area as slightly more detailed/sharper than the rest.

Repeat the same process as before, but make sure that you don’t use too big strokes for the blender. Blurring the edges has always worked well for me.
this method can be used in photoshop as well, with the blur tool. but Painter’s blenders are slightly more efficient. I hope this helps you out :)

I use the blender brush for painting hair, but I use it more as a way to blur certain areas instead of blending the whole thing.

I always use pointed stump as blender. I made a VERY quick and rough walkthrough to show you how you make realistic hair in painter.

The techniques used in this walkthrough is more or less like many other hair-walkthroughs.

So we start with a dark base, this is for blonde hair. Use the blender with 20% opacity to blend out the edges of the hair.

Now, with the same oil brush (smeary round with dab profile set to “circular”) I sketch out the strands or hair. it’s good if they cross each other a little bit, don’t make the lines too uniform - hair tends to separate into “sections” more or less. Which we will discover soon…

Now it’s time to use the blender. Set the opacity to 10% and decrease the size of the blender (otherwise it will turn out just like you said; lumpy).

MAJOR PROTIP: Blurring the ends of the hair will make it look more realistic and less like spaghetti.

Now it’s time to create these so called “sections” I mentioned earlier. By blending only certain areas, we can create a very realistic result. Blend areas where the light brushstrokes are closer to each other, and leave the darker gaps as they are.

This is how it turned out for me. Please note that the size of the brush matter a lot here, it’s still set to 10% opacity.

Continue like this over the whole area, this is how it turned out for me.

Let’s add some highlights, shall we? Take an even smaller sized brush and place the strokes after the hair structure (very important).

The trick for realistic hair is to pick a certain area as slightly more detailed/sharper than the rest.


Repeat the same process as before, but make sure that you don’t use too big strokes for the blender. Blurring the edges has always worked well for me.

this method can be used in photoshop as well, with the blur tool. but Painter’s blenders are slightly more efficient. I hope this helps you out :)

This is another tutorial/guide about Corel Painter 12’s “Brush Control Panels” and what it has to offer that photoshop doesn’t.

If you’ve ever used Sai, you might know about a function that makes the brushstrokes “slow” when placing them - which makes them also smoother and less uneven.
This is awesome, but sadly, SAI is not available for Mac users.
And also, there’s an extension called “Lazy Mouse” that can be used in photoshop that works the same way.
- That is awesome too, but Lazy Mouse is not available for Mac users either.
………….. sometimes, life is unfair if you are a mac user (like me).

BUT DO NOT FRET, MY FRIEND.
Corel Painter 12 will come to the rescue!

I’m gonna show you about the lovely "damping"-setting and why you will love it and abuse it every time you wanna make lineart.
First, pick a brush that you use for lineart (I use Cover Pencil).
Then go to the “Spacing”-panel:

NOTE the Damping-option in the middle. That’s where the magic happens.
Now. Most tools have the damping set to 50%-80%.
But if you set the damping to 90%-100%, you will notice that the strokes are a bit slowed down; think of it a little bit like when photoshop lags and the brush strokes take one-two seconds to complete. But with damping, it’s of course much easier to control this.
Now, here’s a comparison between 1% damping and 100% damping:

(SRSLY JUST LOOK AT THE HEARTS. THE DIFFERENCE IS LIEK….hgngngngngng!!)
After some experimenting with drawing different kinds of shapes, with varying speed and velocity, I came to the conclusion that I prefer 95% damping. 100% is a little bit too slow for me - but might come in handy if you are going to make a very long stroke that you wanna have lots of control over.

And here’s the “Con’s and Pro’s” for this feature. It’s nearly impossible to sketch quickly with a high damping, since the strokes are slowed down. So I suggest that you make one brush for lineart - With 93-100% damping, and one brush for sketching - 60%-80% damping.

I hope this will come in handy for all the Corel users out there<3

This is another tutorial/guide about Corel Painter 12’s “Brush Control Panels” and what it has to offer that photoshop doesn’t.

If you’ve ever used Sai, you might know about a function that makes the brushstrokes “slow” when placing them - which makes them also smoother and less uneven.

This is awesome, but sadly, SAI is not available for Mac users.

And also, there’s an extension called “Lazy Mouse” that can be used in photoshop that works the same way.

- That is awesome too, but Lazy Mouse is not available for Mac users either.

………….. sometimes, life is unfair if you are a mac user (like me).
BUT DO NOT FRET, MY FRIEND.
Corel Painter 12 will come to the rescue!

I’m gonna show you about the lovely "damping"-setting and why you will love it and abuse it every time you wanna make lineart.

First, pick a brush that you use for lineart (I use Cover Pencil).

Then go to the “Spacing”-panel:

NOTE the Damping-option in the middle. That’s where the magic happens.

Now. Most tools have the damping set to 50%-80%.

But if you set the damping to 90%-100%, you will notice that the strokes are a bit slowed down; think of it a little bit like when photoshop lags and the brush strokes take one-two seconds to complete. But with damping, it’s of course much easier to control this.

Now, here’s a comparison between 1% damping and 100% damping:

(SRSLY JUST LOOK AT THE HEARTS. THE DIFFERENCE IS LIEK….hgngngngngng!!)

After some experimenting with drawing different kinds of shapes, with varying speed and velocity, I came to the conclusion that I prefer 95% damping. 100% is a little bit too slow for me - but might come in handy if you are going to make a very long stroke that you wanna have lots of control over.

And here’s the “Con’s and Pro’s” for this feature. It’s nearly impossible to sketch quickly with a high damping, since the strokes are slowed down. So I suggest that you make one brush for lineart - With 93-100% damping, and one brush for sketching - 60%-80% damping.

I hope this will come in handy for all the Corel users out there<3

Maybe it is just because I was simply too lazy to look up what the meaning of &#8220;velocity&#8221; was in my own language (swedish), but I&#8217;ve wondered what Corel Painter&#8217;s brush tracking meant when displaying a certain amount of &#8220;velocity&#8221; (among other things) after analyzing my brush strokes. Now that I know it more or less means &#8220;speed&#8221;, I discovered more possibilities that Corel Painter has.

Velocity means more or less that depending on how quick you place the strokes, the setting will adjust the stroke after it. The picture above displays how it looks like if I set the size expression to "velocity" instead of the very common &#8220;pen pressure&#8221;. This setting is really good if you don&#8217;t own a professional stylus, intuos or other fancy tablets with very good pressure sensitivity.
So instead of controlling the size with pen pressure, you can control it with the speed of your strokes. In my opinion, I think this feels much more closer to traditional painting/drawing.
Now, for you who use Corel Painter XI and higher, here&#8217;s screenshots of the setting on the brush I showed:

I use Oils - Smeary Round as base brush, since I like it&#8217;s&#8230;smeariness :&#8217;D

It&#8217;s important that you set it to Static bristle

Also note that you can reverse the velocity; just click the icon right next to the Expression scroll bar.

"Enable Brush Calibration" is a new feature in the latest version of Corel Painter 12.
For you who are used to Corel Painter might know about the Brush Tracker, when you use it, all brushes will adapt after your personal pressure, velocity and so on.
But if you enable "Brush Calibration", then you can set custom settings to the brush so it isn&#8217;t affected by the Brush Tracking.
Static Bristle:
Here&#8217;s the reason why you should&#8217;ve set the Dab type to Static bristle, this is the window where you have more options that are only available for brushes with the same dab type.
(all other dab types have their own custom setting as well)
Okay then, I think that is all you need to know&#8230;. oh there&#8217;s one more thing:

Maybe it is just because I was simply too lazy to look up what the meaning of “velocity” was in my own language (swedish), but I’ve wondered what Corel Painter’s brush tracking meant when displaying a certain amount of “velocity” (among other things) after analyzing my brush strokes. Now that I know it more or less means “speed”, I discovered more possibilities that Corel Painter has.

Velocity means more or less that depending on how quick you place the strokes, the setting will adjust the stroke after it. The picture above displays how it looks like if I set the size expression to "velocity" instead of the very common “pen pressure”. This setting is really good if you don’t own a professional stylus, intuos or other fancy tablets with very good pressure sensitivity.

So instead of controlling the size with pen pressure, you can control it with the speed of your strokes. In my opinion, I think this feels much more closer to traditional painting/drawing.

Now, for you who use Corel Painter XI and higher, here’s screenshots of the setting on the brush I showed:


I use Oils - Smeary Round as base brush, since I like it’s…smeariness :’D

It’s important that you set it to Static bristle

Also note that you can reverse the velocity; just click the icon right next to the Expression scroll bar.

"Enable Brush Calibration" is a new feature in the latest version of Corel Painter 12.

For you who are used to Corel Painter might know about the Brush Tracker, when you use it, all brushes will adapt after your personal pressure, velocity and so on.

But if you enable "Brush Calibration", then you can set custom settings to the brush so it isn’t affected by the Brush Tracking.

Static Bristle:

Here’s the reason why you should’ve set the Dab type to Static bristle, this is the window where you have more options that are only available for brushes with the same dab type.

(all other dab types have their own custom setting as well)

Okay then, I think that is all you need to know…. oh there’s one more thing:

Reiq’s Corel Painter tutorial

It was actually quite a while since I actually read through a whole tutorial - and by that I mean, REALLY reading the text and following the steps carefully.

I stumbled upon a video tutorial by Reiq (you know, one of those dudes that always reach the front page on dA) showing how he work in Corel Painter.

Since I love to use Corel, I needed to check it out. The video was more of a process-video, but he had a step-by-step version of it that was much more of a help.

I truly recommend you all who are new to corel (ping Marina!) and would like to learn how to create your own good custom brushes - because that is one of the more common trouble I’ve had with corel.

Corel is a good program, I love the mixer palette and the blender and so on. But I seem to never find any good brush to use for actual painting - the oil brushes look “hairy” and other brushes are too pixelated, too grainy or too…. TRADITIONAL-LOOKING!

But  guess that’s the main idea with corel - the brushes are not just pixel-based-derp-brushes that you can easily create in photoshop. Corel’s brushes are programmed to behave like traditional tools - so if you combine one kind of a blender with different oils or watercolors, it will blend with different results depending on the brush picked.

So you might then understand that creating your own customized brush in corel is a little bit more advanced than in photoshop. But thanks to following Reiq’s tutorial, I find a good brush for lineart (cover pencil - 70% opacity) and how to fix the oil brush to not have that hairy-effect (go to general settings for brushes and change “camel hair” to “circular”).

I truly recommend all corel beginners to check out his tutorial. ESPECIALLY the beginning, where he explains how to fix the oil brush.

here’s the tutorial—-> link!

Vagina Mouth by =BittersweetDisease
Delicious abs. Manly man is now finished!

Vagina Mouth by =BittersweetDisease

Delicious abs. Manly man is now finished!