Mirre's personal artblog
A 24 year old human who likes to draw stuff, especially comics. This is my personal artblog where I will post doodles, WIPs and finished artwork and also text posts with ignorant opinions. I'm doing my best. Enjoy your stay!
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Random Character/Creature/Scenery generator!

Wanna challenge yourself? Out of artistic ideas? Then try out these three lovely generators.

They are prob one of the better generators i’ve found out there. It’s via the awesome community crimsondaggers.com

CHARACTER GENERATOR

This one does not only tell you what kind of looks the character have, but everything like the shape of the eyebrows to what character archetype it is.

CREATURE GENERATOR

Creates suggestions of all kinds of creatures.

SCENE GENERATOR

This one is my personal favourite, if you wanna practise environments, but have no idea what kind to draw then this is the perfect tool for you!

NOW GO CREATE AWESOME STUFF USING THESE GENERATORS!

AllPaintings.org - An easy site to browse all the official Art genres with ACCURATE facts and photo examples

PLEASE BROWSE THIS WEBSITE BEFORE YOU START USING THE WORD “REALISM” ON YOUR ART.

I think this is very important for any young artist out there to check out.

Every day I see people miscategorize art on dA, tumblr and other places. Because it’s obvious that most of those ppl don’t have any goddang clue at what they are talking about.

So yeah, take some time and browse through this website, it gots LOTS of examples of painting in a certain genre/era/category.

Also please note that there is no “semi-realism” category; that word is actually not yet an official art category from what I’ve seen.














Motorcity characters owned by Titmouse Studios.
This is a sequel to THIS TUTORIAL <— link!

Motorcity characters owned by Titmouse Studios.

This is a sequel to THIS TUTORIAL <— link!

Livestream-workshop wednesday? Fakk yeah!

So, I decided to host a quick little workshop-livestream about RIGHT NOW :DD

We are going to continue with facial diversity and facial shapes! It was mainly thanks to the motorcity meme I did that inspired me to bring up this subject again.

The reason why I have a workshop stream today and not on a friday, is because I’m going to Stockholm tomorrow and will stay there over the weekend. So there’s a chance that I might not be able to livestream during that time, so I’ll stream a workshop today instead!

Every artist who sees this post should do the following:

- Watch the video.

- Follow the instructions

- Reblog

I can’t stress you enough about how important these exercises are for your drawing hand. You don’t wanna get CTS of Tendonitis and similar stuff that will prevent you from making art or even hold  a pencil.

Color and Values. A mini-guide in how you use Overlay to color a grayscale painting.(UPDATE!!)

UPDATE: For photoshop users. Use the LAB-sliders in order to get the right value for the colors;



I think I’ve done something like this long ago, but that tutorial is not really up to date since I didn’t 100% understood this technique back then.

But tonight, I finally understand how it’s done.

And I know that some people out there might be laughing or be surprised that I didn’t know this before, but hey - they never really brought up this subject in my art school (which also was aimed at comics and not really at digital art eheh.)

This method should work in any digital art software that has layer functions, the blending mode “Overlay”, “Multiply”, “Saturation” and a filter/mode that can turn the picture into grayscale.

First, I’ll begin with showing how saturation can fool your eye to believe it’s “lighter” than the midtone.

Here we have two blue eggs, or something. They almost look like having the same color on the highlighted part.

But if we turn the picture to grayscale, we can clearly see that the right egg has a lighter value than the left egg.

The colors are different on the eggs highlighted areas. The left one has a much more saturated color. While the other one simply has a lighter value.

However, this is more visible to the human eye if we turn it into grayscale! The contrast is much more visible in grayscale!

What I learned from this is that more or less ALL 100% saturated colors share the same value!

Here’s another example:

The warm colors in this picture all have the same value.

We can see this when we switch over to grayscale.

Having a good and wide range of values (light and darkness) in a painting, is what makes it pleasing for the human eye. This is why black and white photography i still very popular for example. 

That said, with a good set of values in the composition, you can make ANY kind of artwork in ANY kind of style give 10x more impact on the viewer.

So, how do we use this knowledge when we wanna color a grayscale value painting?

Well, first off you should take a look at how the color wheel works.

Or more like… color triangle!

Now, this is how the color wheel looks in Corel Painter. I removed some of the color wheel here because of reasons.

I DO NOT know if you can get the color wheel like this in Paint Tool Sai. I know that Photoshop use a square instead (that more or less works the same way).

The important thing here to keep in mind is that along the line where you can read “Saturation”, no matter how high or low the saturation is, it can still have the exactly same VALUE.

Now, let’s continue to the painting.

Here’s the value painting that I did in grayscale.

In order to color this, I’ll add a Overlay-layer above it.

Now this is some funky colors!

However, what we should keep in mind here is that ALL the colors on the overlay-layer has the exact same value. And that value would more or less be 50% gray. (Meaning, in the middle of the value-range from black to white).

Now, the purple and orange color in the background has both the same value (“lightness/darkness”). So this would mean that if we turned the painting to grayscale, the stripes should barely be visible…

Okay, the reason why the striped still are visible, is because I used a brush that is slightly blending the colors, so the outline of the strokes turn out a bit lighter.

However, this still proves what I told earlier.

So, if you just make sure that the colors on the overlay layer all has the same value. You should be able to color the painting in any kind of color, but still have the same values when turned into grayscale.

And this is why it’s so popular among Concept artists to work in grayscale when they for example do character/monster design; they can do several different versions of  one monster with different colors but still keep the same values.

Here’s a Note to Self (I’ll write it down here in case you can’t see the picture):

- Let the value painting) control the values - NOT the color-layer.

- All the colors on the Overlay layer should ALL have the same value. Vary the tones by the amount of saturation instead. (The amount of saturation should not affect the values.)

The left one is more or less the finished result. By lowering the saturation, I managed to give the skin different skintones. The one to the right is more or less the value-painting before I added color. Now let’s do a last test and check if I have messed up the values on the colored version…

Aaaaaand as you can see, it’s more or less the same values! Yes, there’s some small areas where it’ a bit darker, I discovered that some colors do affect the values even if it’s *supposed* to have the same value. However, the difference they do is very subtle and isn’t really a major problem.

I srsly feel so happy to finally understand how the heck this method works. This is more or less that part I never get to hear about in all those tutorials in value-painting. 

NOW GO PRACTICE VALUE PAINTING! >:D



















&#8230; I apologize for any weird typos and for my horrible handwriting in this. I am very tired. And I really don&#8217;t know why I choosed to handwrite the text. I&#8217;m stupid, but this was very fun to do.
Please note that some of the last illustrations are pretty old, but should still serve as okay examples of different faces. I wished I could make more examples, but I&#8217;m very very tired and this took me several hours to do. Anyway, I hope this will help you out.
Will make a polished-version for dA sooner or later&#8230;

… I apologize for any weird typos and for my horrible handwriting in this. I am very tired. And I really don’t know why I choosed to handwrite the text. I’m stupid, but this was very fun to do.

Please note that some of the last illustrations are pretty old, but should still serve as okay examples of different faces. I wished I could make more examples, but I’m very very tired and this took me several hours to do. Anyway, I hope this will help you out.

Will make a polished-version for dA sooner or later…

Tonight’s livestream session: Facial Diversity in Anime style and facial expressions!

foervraengd:

Later, in about one hour or so, i’ll start livestreaming.

I’ll try to do a little bit of the same thing as yesterday; I write down notes and examples and you guys draw after me like a bunch of kawaii students desu<3

I know that many people have trouble with the so called “same-face-syndrome”, especially people who are very keen to their style, but wanna have diversity within their prefered drawing style. this is gonna be a little bit of a experiment. I’ll make another post later once the livestream gets started.

If you have any questions about this subject, send me a note or comment on this post so I can prepare a little bit. :)

LIVESTREAM HAS STAAAARTED! COME, COME MY LITTLE ARTISTS! JUST CLICK HERE AND YOU’LL GET TO THE LIVESTREAM CHANNEL!!

So this is what I produced today at the livestream session I had. What I did was to write down the very hard-to-read-notes on Michael Mentler&#8217;s sketches from his anatomy thread: "Book of Bones" on conceptart.org. About 95% of the information here comes from mentler&#8217;s knowledge, this is really just how I study stuff personally, so ALL CRED goes to this awesome dude. People wanted to see this stuff afterwards, so I made a post with the finished content.
Make sure to check out Mentler&#8217;s thread, you&#8217;ll find tons and tons of more stuff there + his drawings are  hngngngng&lt;3
anyway, let&#8217;s get started:






And here is PART 2:








Please Note: The &#8220;homework&#8221; part is something I made up myself. And by &#8220;extra weight&#8221;, I do not mean *only* pregnant women, but also stuff like carrying a heavy bag with one arm, or wearing a very heavy backpack (this would work best drawn in profile view in order to show how the mass distribution keeps the body balanced).
Also note the colors used in the last examples. 
The two first have are balanced, we can see this because the cyan and red colors are more or less evenly distributed (using the line of gravity as a &#8220;border&#8221;). But on the last one to the right, there&#8217;s more red. Which also proves that the body is unbalanced, and that the person will trip and fall any moment.

So this is what I produced today at the livestream session I had. What I did was to write down the very hard-to-read-notes on Michael Mentler’s sketches from his anatomy thread: "Book of Bones" on conceptart.org. About 95% of the information here comes from mentler’s knowledge, this is really just how I study stuff personally, so ALL CRED goes to this awesome dude. People wanted to see this stuff afterwards, so I made a post with the finished content.

Make sure to check out Mentler’s thread, you’ll find tons and tons of more stuff there + his drawings are  hngngngng<3

anyway, let’s get started:

And here is PART 2:

Please Note: The “homework” part is something I made up myself. And by “extra weight”, I do not mean *only* pregnant women, but also stuff like carrying a heavy bag with one arm, or wearing a very heavy backpack (this would work best drawn in profile view in order to show how the mass distribution keeps the body balanced).

Also note the colors used in the last examples. 

The two first have are balanced, we can see this because the cyan and red colors are more or less evenly distributed (using the line of gravity as a “border”). But on the last one to the right, there’s more red. Which also proves that the body is unbalanced, and that the person will trip and fall any moment.

I think I could give both of you the same answer, since your questions more or less relate a lot to each other.
When you feel overwhelmed of starting with a new area, you get easily frustrated and rarely satisfied with your first tries.
May I remind you that it took me over half a year to progress through lots of tries and fails. It&#8217;s not until recently that i&#8217;ve started to feel a bit more confident in my environmental paintings.
You can actually just dig through my archive in my blog to look for yourselves more or less.
When you are frustrated, and you are really really fighting with this picture but something doesn&#8217;t look right but you don&#8217;t know what and so on - just stop working on it. If it only makes you feel art-blocked, then start a new, different environment painting.
If you worked on a forest, then the next one could be a snowy tundra. Snowy environments are btw pretty easy and fun to paint. Since you can really play around with cool, blueish shadows and warm lights.
Since environment paintings for games or illustrations, are all based more or less on real places and the real nature here on earth, it&#8217;s recommended that you try out painting regular places like a taiga forest, a mangrove swamp, a sunny beach and so on. They are basic and there&#8217;s plenty of references.
Also don&#8217;t forget to check out these two templates for different themed environment-challenges: Background Challenge 1 and Ultimate Background Challenge
I&#8217;d suggest you spend about 20-30 minutes on each environment. You can use either a photograph to do a very rough study on. Or use your own imagination from what you know how that particular environment looks like.

I dug through my old archives and found some old paintings I never finished that might show other techniques I used at the start:


I remember when I made this one, I was inspired by a color scheme from a painting I saw online. This kind of painting isn&#8217;t really so much of an environment - it&#8217;s just a mountain, but I think it&#8217;s not a bad idea to actually take your time and draw common nature objects separately. Just to get a bit familiar with how they look like and try out different techniques on how to paint them until you find the one that suits you.
Also, I think it&#8217;s really really fun to paint clouds. You have no idea how incredibly fun it can be if you just throw in some colors!

This one was one of my very first tries at buildings, without having to use vanishing points (aka &#8220;cheating&#8221; LOL). For nature and landscapes, starting with overlapping silhouettes as shown in this painting is not a bad start. Dontrast and backlight always looks good.
Remember to not be afraid to do very cliché paintings in the beginning, if you don&#8217;t get those cliché little nuggets down on the canvas first, they will take up space in your brain where you could&#8217;ve store more original ideas for later! :D


This one is also one of those paintings I never really finished. I think this was gonna contain airships and stuff like that, but I got bored before I even added that stuff.
However, as you can see, I used air perspective and overlapping silhouettes for the mountains. Also note that the colors are darker and more saturated as they are closer to the &#8220;camera&#8221;.
And also the most important one to do:

Do either life drawing studies of environments if you live in such a cool area.
Or do studies of photography, I strongly recommend you to go take your own photo references if possible.

A photo study I never really finished on. heh. 
but I&#8217;m happy I at least tried and got started even though I rarely finished so many of the studies and thumbnails I worked on.

I hope these sort of help you peeps out!

I think I could give both of you the same answer, since your questions more or less relate a lot to each other.

When you feel overwhelmed of starting with a new area, you get easily frustrated and rarely satisfied with your first tries.

May I remind you that it took me over half a year to progress through lots of tries and fails. It’s not until recently that i’ve started to feel a bit more confident in my environmental paintings.

You can actually just dig through my archive in my blog to look for yourselves more or less.

When you are frustrated, and you are really really fighting with this picture but something doesn’t look right but you don’t know what and so on - just stop working on it. If it only makes you feel art-blocked, then start a new, different environment painting.

If you worked on a forest, then the next one could be a snowy tundra. Snowy environments are btw pretty easy and fun to paint. Since you can really play around with cool, blueish shadows and warm lights.

Since environment paintings for games or illustrations, are all based more or less on real places and the real nature here on earth, it’s recommended that you try out painting regular places like a taiga forest, a mangrove swamp, a sunny beach and so on. They are basic and there’s plenty of references.

Also don’t forget to check out these two templates for different themed environment-challenges: Background Challenge 1 and Ultimate Background Challenge

I’d suggest you spend about 20-30 minutes on each environment. You can use either a photograph to do a very rough study on. Or use your own imagination from what you know how that particular environment looks like.

I dug through my old archives and found some old paintings I never finished that might show other techniques I used at the start:

I remember when I made this one, I was inspired by a color scheme from a painting I saw online. This kind of painting isn’t really so much of an environment - it’s just a mountain, but I think it’s not a bad idea to actually take your time and draw common nature objects separately. Just to get a bit familiar with how they look like and try out different techniques on how to paint them until you find the one that suits you.

Also, I think it’s really really fun to paint clouds. You have no idea how incredibly fun it can be if you just throw in some colors!

This one was one of my very first tries at buildings, without having to use vanishing points (aka “cheating” LOL). For nature and landscapes, starting with overlapping silhouettes as shown in this painting is not a bad start. Dontrast and backlight always looks good.

Remember to not be afraid to do very cliché paintings in the beginning, if you don’t get those cliché little nuggets down on the canvas first, they will take up space in your brain where you could’ve store more original ideas for later! :D


This one is also one of those paintings I never really finished. I think this was gonna contain airships and stuff like that, but I got bored before I even added that stuff.

However, as you can see, I used air perspective and overlapping silhouettes for the mountains. Also note that the colors are darker and more saturated as they are closer to the “camera”.

And also the most important one to do:

Do either life drawing studies of environments if you live in such a cool area.

Or do studies of photography, I strongly recommend you to go take your own photo references if possible.

A photo study I never really finished on. heh.

but I’m happy I at least tried and got started even though I rarely finished so many of the studies and thumbnails I worked on.

I hope these sort of help you peeps out!

Expanding the comfort-zone by =FOERVRAENGD
Decided to analyze my own improvement in environment painting.

Expanding the comfort-zone by =FOERVRAENGD

Decided to analyze my own improvement in environment painting.

A redline correction/&#8221;guide&#8221; in how to draw a five year old child. Helped Ninja during the livestream with her drawing and what to think about next time.

I&#8217;ve noticed that there&#8217;s very little references/resources when it comes to draw children bodies, it&#8217;s probably because the thought of a naked child has become so taboo. But if someone has some good resources of drawings of childrens anatomy, it would be nice to know. What I&#8217;ve shown here is more or less all I currently know about this subject.

A redline correction/”guide” in how to draw a five year old child. Helped Ninja during the livestream with her drawing and what to think about next time.

I’ve noticed that there’s very little references/resources when it comes to draw children bodies, it’s probably because the thought of a naked child has become so taboo. But if someone has some good resources of drawings of childrens anatomy, it would be nice to know. What I’ve shown here is more or less all I currently know about this subject.

I use the blender brush for painting hair, but I use it more as a way to blur certain areas instead of blending the whole thing.
I always use pointed stump as blender. I made a VERY quick and rough walkthrough to show you how you make realistic hair in painter.
The techniques used in this walkthrough is more or less like many other hair-walkthroughs.

So we start with a dark base, this is for blonde hair. Use the blender with 20% opacity to blend out the edges of the hair.

Now, with the same oil brush (smeary round with dab profile set to &#8220;circular&#8221;) I sketch out the strands or hair. it&#8217;s good if they cross each other a little bit, don&#8217;t make the lines too uniform - hair tends to separate into &#8220;sections&#8221; more or less. Which we will discover soon&#8230;

Now it&#8217;s time to use the blender. Set the opacity to 10% and decrease the size of the blender (otherwise it will turn out just like you said; lumpy).
MAJOR PROTIP: Blurring the ends of the hair will make it look more realistic and less like spaghetti.

Now it&#8217;s time to create these so called &#8220;sections&#8221; I mentioned earlier. By blending only certain areas, we can create a very realistic result. Blend areas where the light brushstrokes are closer to each other, and leave the darker gaps as they are.

This is how it turned out for me. Please note that the size of the brush matter a lot here, it&#8217;s still set to 10% opacity.

Continue like this over the whole area, this is how it turned out for me.

Let&#8217;s add some highlights, shall we? Take an even smaller sized brush and place the strokes after the hair structure (very important).
The trick for realistic hair is to pick a certain area as slightly more detailed/sharper than the rest.

Repeat the same process as before, but make sure that you don&#8217;t use too big strokes for the blender. Blurring the edges has always worked well for me.
this method can be used in photoshop as well, with the blur tool. but Painter&#8217;s blenders are slightly more efficient. I hope this helps you out :)

I use the blender brush for painting hair, but I use it more as a way to blur certain areas instead of blending the whole thing.

I always use pointed stump as blender. I made a VERY quick and rough walkthrough to show you how you make realistic hair in painter.

The techniques used in this walkthrough is more or less like many other hair-walkthroughs.

So we start with a dark base, this is for blonde hair. Use the blender with 20% opacity to blend out the edges of the hair.

Now, with the same oil brush (smeary round with dab profile set to “circular”) I sketch out the strands or hair. it’s good if they cross each other a little bit, don’t make the lines too uniform - hair tends to separate into “sections” more or less. Which we will discover soon…

Now it’s time to use the blender. Set the opacity to 10% and decrease the size of the blender (otherwise it will turn out just like you said; lumpy).

MAJOR PROTIP: Blurring the ends of the hair will make it look more realistic and less like spaghetti.

Now it’s time to create these so called “sections” I mentioned earlier. By blending only certain areas, we can create a very realistic result. Blend areas where the light brushstrokes are closer to each other, and leave the darker gaps as they are.

This is how it turned out for me. Please note that the size of the brush matter a lot here, it’s still set to 10% opacity.

Continue like this over the whole area, this is how it turned out for me.

Let’s add some highlights, shall we? Take an even smaller sized brush and place the strokes after the hair structure (very important).

The trick for realistic hair is to pick a certain area as slightly more detailed/sharper than the rest.


Repeat the same process as before, but make sure that you don’t use too big strokes for the blender. Blurring the edges has always worked well for me.

this method can be used in photoshop as well, with the blur tool. but Painter’s blenders are slightly more efficient. I hope this helps you out :)

Applying basic light theory to your art (aka “how to make ridiculously shiny stuff”)

In this mini-guide, I’m going to more or less explain how the heck you apply basic light theory on your art. But with a bit more exaggerated effects.

I am going to start off by using a reference photo I took myself in a museum I visited the other day.

This is a piece of Pyrite (aka “Fool’s Gold”) which is very reflective, and is pretty cool.

I used this as a reference and eye-ball copied it. Since most of the colors are pretty saturated, it wasn’t that hard to guess the colors. (I did not color pick from the photo - unless you are colorblind, you should learn to pick color only by observation. It’s good for your artistic eye.)

Here’s my painting of the pyrite. It’s not as textured or detailed as the reference, but turned out good enough. The orange light comes from a piece of table/wood beneath the pyrite that is not visible from the photo.

The shape of the object is a nice variation from the regular “sphere” that you always see in light-theory.

Now let’s apply there light sources on a portrait - makin it shiny shiny!

But first we should look up another reference!

This picture was done by the AMAZING Virtual Lighting Tool where you can add several light sources, change the placement of the “lamps”, even add colors and all kind of nice gadgets. This screenshot contains more or less the same lightsources that we got from the Pyrite painting.

Now this time I did use the color picker - but not from the photograph, but from the painting I did earlier. This was a really fun experiment and a great way to practice shiny objects.

Livestreaming!

Doing some light study!

Livestreaming!

Doing some light study!